The process that the earth uses to create oil has been discovered, its is called Thermal Depolymerization(TDP). Basically heat organic or inorganic materials up with steam and they start to separate into oil and the other elements they are made of. The TDP process has been able to decrease the time it takes to make oil from millions of years to about 15 minutes. For example the company Tyson that makes us all the chicken nuggets and delicious lunch meats and Thanksgiving turkeys have a huge amount of waste from there process. In 2001 they started to send those wastes to a TDP plant and turned 600 million tons of turkey guts and other waste into 4 billion barrels of light Texas oil.

Unlike other solid-to-liquid-fuel processes such as cornstarch into ethanol, this one will accept almost any carbon-based feedstock. If a 175-pound man fell into one end, he would come out the other end as 38 pounds of oil, 7 pounds of gas, and 7 pounds of minerals, as well as 123 pounds of sterilized water. While no one plans to put people into a thermal depolymerization machine they are planning to put the human sewage and trash in an have oil come out.

So how does it work? The other processes all tried to drive out water. We drive it in, inside this tank, with heat and pressure. We super-hydrate the material.” Thus temperatures and pressures need only be modest, because water helps to convey heat into the feedstock. “We’re talking about temperatures of 500 degrees Fahrenheit and pressures of about 600 pounds for most organic material—not at all extreme or energy intensive. And the cooking times are pretty short, usually about 15 minutes.”

Once the organic soup is heated and partially depolymerized in the reactor vessel, phase two begins. “We quickly drop the slurry to a lower pressure,” says Appel, pointing at a branching series of pipes. The rapid depressurization releases about 90 percent of the slurry’s free water. Dehydration via depressurization is far cheaper in terms of energy consumed than is heating and boiling off the water, particularly because no heat is wasted. “We send the flashed-off water back up there,” Appel says, pointing to a pipe that leads to the beginning of the process, “to heat the incoming stream.”

At this stage, the minerals—in turkey waste, they come mostly from bones—settle out and are shunted to storage tanks. Rich in calcium and magnesium, the dried brown powder “is a perfect balanced fertilizer,” Appel says.

The remaining concentrated organic soup gushes into a second-stage reactor similar to the coke ovens used to refine oil into gasoline. “This technology is as old as the hills,” says Appel, grinning broadly. The reactor heats the soup to about 900 degrees Fahrenheit to further break apart long molecular chains. Next, in vertical distillation columns, hot vapor flows up, condenses, and flows out from different levels: gases from the top of the column, light oils from the upper middle, heavier oils from the middle, water from the lower middle, and powdered carbon—used to manufacture tires, filters, and printer toners—from the bottom. “Gas is expensive to transport, so we use it on-site in the plant to heat the process,” Appel says. The oil, minerals, and carbon are sold to the highest bidders.

Depending on the feedstock and the cooking and coking times, the process can be tweaked to make other specialty chemicals that may be even more profitable than oil. Turkey offal, for example, can be used to produce fatty acids for soap, tires, paints, and lubricants. Polyvinyl chloride, or PVC—the stuff of house siding, wallpapers, and plastic pipes—yields hydrochloric acid, a relatively benign and industrially valuable chemical used to make cleaners and solvents. “That’s what’s so great about making water a friend,” says Appel. “The hydrogen in water combines with the chlorine in PVC to make it safe. If you burn PVC [in a municipal-waste incinerator], you get dioxin—very toxic.”

Anything-Into-Oil1may03b

A. industrial grinder/blender B. heated water and steam C. Vacuum removal of water and solid separation D. water and oils separation E. gases separation and reused to fuel unit F. Oil of all grades out ie. light medium and heavy

“The potential is unbelievable,” says Michael Roberts, a senior chemical engineer for the Gas Technology Institute, an energy research group. “You’re not only cleaning up waste; you’re talkingabout distributed generation of oil all over the world.”

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